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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN 27
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English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [applause] >> next the chairman of cbs news. then bill gates talks about changes in education. then youth campaign to fix the national debt. >>> on news makers mayor kay henry talks about the so-called fiscal cliff and wa what unions hope will happen. news makers sunday at 10:00 and 6:00 eastern on c-span. >> jeff sog gerfwame first chairman of cbs news. now he talked about the future of news at the arizona state university downtown campus in phoenix. this is just over an hour. >> good evening, everyone. the cronkite school has a special relationship with cbs news. walter cronkite served as the evening news anger for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how those values rema
and personal life. then the chairman of cbs news talks about the future of journalism and network news. later, ted koppel on democracy and the media. >> your career officers, you changed this army so that it became a volunteer army. go and find your soldiers in the labor market. go find in the villages and towns in america. over five or six years, we created an absolutely splendid force of young men and women who are willing to serve their country as volunteers, and they had the same tradition, the same culture, the same loyalty and dedication as any other generation of americans who have ever gone before. they prove themselves in the gulf war, the panama invasion, and they have proved themselves in the last 10 years in iraq and afghanistan. the thing we have to keep in mind is something president lincoln said in his second inaugural address. you care for those who have borne the battle. that means never forget they are carrying the american spirit, they are carrying the american traditions with them. when they get injured, when they get hurt, or when they just come back to be -- -- reintegra
.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, the vice president of facebook talks >> after that the chairman of cbs news on the future of the network. now a conversation with chris cox, facebook's vice president of product. he talks about the evolution of facebook at a conference at the university of california san diego. this is about 50 minutes. >> thanks, everyone for coming. i do think this is actually a bit of a treat. i have been covering facebook for years and years, and you rarely see chris cox out here doing his visionary thing that you are about to get. your title as the vp of product, which is a suspiciously vague title -- what do you actually do on a day-to-day basis? >> over the last three years, i have built out the product management and the design teams. each group of people that is building a new feature or product has a bunch of engineers, a product manager, and some designers. i have been responsible for building out the product management and design and functions at facebook. >> for people who might not think of product the way you do, what is a product on facebook? >> the like butto
balancing work and personal life. then, the chairman of cbs news talks about the future of journalism and network news. >> you changed this army so it becomes a volunteer army -- go and find your soldiers in the labour market. find them in the villages and towns of america. and we did that. over a period of five or six years, we created a splendid force of young men and women who are willing to serve their country as volunteers. and they had the same tradition, the same culture, the same loyalty and dedication as any other generation of americans ever had before. they proved themselves in the gulf war, the panama invasion, they prove themselves in the last 10 years in iran and afghanistan. -- ira afghanistanq . the theme we have to keep in mind is something that lincoln said -- care for those, the widow and children, to care -- it means never forget that they are carrying the american spirit. they are carrying the american tradition with them. when they get injured, when they get hurt, when they just come back to be integrated into society, we have to be waiting to care for them, not
, the former 60 minutes executive producer, not share of cbs news, talks about the future of network news. he spoke at arizona state university for just over an hour. >> good evening, everyone. the cronkite school has a special relationship with cbs news. walter cronkite the cronkite school has a special relationship with cbs news. walter cronkite served as the evening news anger for nearly 20 years becoming known as the most trusted man in america for his objective, straightforward reporting. he was the face of cbs. three years after he stepped down from the news anger desk, -- anchor desk, the school was named in is honored. that grew over the next 25 years. today three years after his passing, he continues to be our guiding light. it is truly a special honor to have jeff fager with us tonight to talk about the traditional values of journalism and how those values remain the cornerstone of cbs news today in our digital age. he became the chairman and february 2011. cbs news won a peabody award under his leadership and was the only network to grow its audience. he also has relaunched cbs th
"why women still can't have it all." and cbs news chairman on the future of network tv news at the walter cronkite school of journalism at arizona state university. in about 45 minutes, we will preview of some of the cases coming up in the supreme court. at 8:30 eastern,
officials or any person in a place of power. thank you. host: and want to point out this story from cbs news. -- i want to point out this story from cbs news. "jesse jackson jr. has not yet pleaded guilty to the legend misuse of campaign funds, but cbs chicago reports that the congressman's lawyer and criminal defense attorney is negotiating with several governments a plea deal that will likely be reached by the end of the year. now i want to go to cathy, from st. petersburg, florida, on the subject of the resignation of general petraeus. cathy is on the democratic line this morning. caller: i cannot believe his react -- cannot believe this reaction. he is not just a regular soldier having a fling, he is the head of the cia. this woman, broadwell, ok, she is a harvard graduate, west point graduate. he was very impressed with her, sleeping with her, god knows what he told her. she sent his e-mail, his click to another woman. ok, she has the judgment and is repulse of now. does this not make you wonder, what the heck? host: what do you think this does to the generals legacy after his work in a
into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that is enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our sacred craft of journalism? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> what are your predictions? [laughter] >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans are finally realize how bad things are, and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think there may be a resurgence of the kind you and i grew up with. >> it is a marvelous, optimistic thought. >> actually, no, it is a terrible thought because it suggests that the ship will almost have to sink before people jump into the lifeboats again. >> do you think that we can, truly, even define journalism? if somebody walks in the room and came from mars, and said what are these just talking about? if journalism, explain it to that guy. >> i guess the simplest way is to take it back to wh
or some of the partisan member. i was troubled by the july report from cbs news that found suicide rates for our soldiers is up 80%. our veterans are returning from war with invisible wounds. but are discouraging from seeking the treatments for various reasons. as a nation we can do better and we must get right. and to the american legion, i ask you to continue help in this regard as you lobby but committee of veterans affairs and i hope you are also lobbying committees on armed services to make sure they are dealing with this issue as well. care must began with a person who is on active duty before they take off the uniform and become veterans as well. service members -- if you look at another area of effort we have to do better on -- it is for military training. look at jobs. service members are experienced in many different career fields that can be varied such as electronics, madison, air- traffic control, and we've got to do everything we can as congress to help our veterans find jobs when they come back. and i think it is important for the american legion with the broad outreach to
the bus stops rolling? john dickerson, cbs news? >> the best online magazine other than the atlantic slate. >> thank you, margaret. i can't tell whether we're in a living room or a therapy room. >> we have 20 minutes until the shuttle departs for cancun or something. let's start with both of you worked for these candidates in the last campaign and you now are here for this one. jen, what was different this time around? >> nothing. [laughter] you know, it was entirely different from the beginning. there was a lot that has been written about how it was different. there was this amazing wave of enthusiasm and excitement. this time was no question harder fought. there were harder days. there wasn't a wave at the end, as we all know. a very -- i'll call them a very, very senior administration official. this is a very good aanalogy for it. the first campaign was like being in a relationship. everything is gleeful. you're happy. you don't see anything wrong in the person and you ride the wave of happiness. the second campaign was after you have been married for a few years, had a couple of kids,
a cbs news story. host: this from nbc news, i apologize. bam >> former u.s. senator evan bayh discusses about the fiscal cliff. then, the global reaction to president obama's reelection. does your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets, "washington journal wife, tuesday. -- live, tuesday. >> congress is back to mar with the ussr representatives. -- tomorrow with the us house of representatives. also at 2:00, and c-span2, live coverage of the senate as members resumed consideration of the sportsman's bill. congressional leaders go to the white house on friday to meet with president obama about kissell issues. >> i enjoy watching booked tv and the rebroadcasts of various television news programs. coverage of the fence about all of the sound bites and the editing ec on other programs. it gives me an opportunity to consume the news and information and make up my own mind about what is going on. c-span is a great way to get an unfiltered view of the day's events. >> dear kengo is watching c-span on comcast. -- derek hill is watching c-span on comcast. but you as a public service by your television
, the cbs news chairman and the future of network tv news. he spoke to students at the walter cronkite school of journalism at arizona state university. >> in a few moments, more about the election with president obama's campaign manager. in an hour, a look at education policy and school choice. after that, a discussion on the evolution of facebook. later, a forum on how demint could solve the world's problems. -- gaming could solve the world's problems. >> on washington journal tomorrow morning -- we preview some of the cases coming up in the supreme court with david savage of the los angeles times. then, a guest from the institute of policy studies will take your questions and comments about the fact of military deployments. then a guest to discuss his "washington monthly" article about the energy bill. live on c-span every day at 7:30 a.m. eastern. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grant at saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? he did. i am not going to say grant was the only person who saved the union. but he was the commanding general
column. he is an analyst at cbs news. he is the author of several books, which may have read, "the broken branch -- how congress is bailing america." "it's even worse than it looks -- how the constitutional system is divided over extremism." he has been an quoted many times. i recall an article in the 1990's where he was quoted for , "i have no idea." if you can get quoted for that, you have a unique status in washington, d.c. next will be bill wichteman. burlington he was a special assistant to george w. bush -- formerly he was a special assistant. here was a policy adviser to bill frisk. he has a very deep experience in matters in both the house and senate which makes and somewhat unique. he has been at the top of the pyramid in both chambers. his time with former senate leader frisk is a help. he hashe has also worked in the santorum campaign. the fourth and final speaker will be brian darling, who is here at heritage afor the time being. he is a senior fellow at government studies. he mahler -- monitors political events and assess this impact on policy decisions on things in general.
places around the state. taking a look at some of the reporters covering the campaign -- from cbs in new jersey reporting mitt romney, wheels down in pittsburgh -- his final stop before getting back to boston she also corrects an earlier tweet from paul ryan say he is running on fumes. democratic headquarters in seattle has been broken into and nancy pelosi's home was burglarized. that is from the hill. we're speaking with political and campaign reporters to get their take on election 2012. >> i am looking at nine states right now we think are too close to call. five are held by democrats. i'm looking at states like connecticut, montana, north dakota, virginia, and wisconsin. i'm looking at republican seats in massachusetts, nevada, indiana and arizona. these nine races will tell the story. >> what makes this so special? >> those are all races with a margin of error. they're all very, very close. in fact, i'm not sure we're going to know the answer on tuesday night. we may be looking at wednesday or thursday before we know for sure. >> is there one race that stands out to you that could
is a fellow at the truman national security project. you can hear him doing analysis for cbs radio news. thank you. that is all for "washington journal" today. tomorrow we will be talking with matt about the future of the republican party and dan about the potential for a better part is an agreement on the fiscal cliff. we will also look at the federal housing administration and $16 billion shortfall. that is all at 7:00 eastern tomorrow morning. we will see you then. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> next on c-span, "newsmakers" with mary kay henry
koppel talks about the future of network news. he is interviewed by a former cbs reporter. they will touch on the changes in network news caused by the digital age. that is at 8:00 eastern. [video clip] >> how does one adequately express his feelings about a special friend? when that friend is also a world icon, a national hero of unimaginable proportions, and a legend whose name will live in history long after all here today have been forgotten? fate click the down kindly on us when she chose neil to be the first adventurist to another world and to have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our home. it could have been another, but it wasn't. and it wasn't for a reason. no one could have accepted the responsibility of his remarkable accomplishments with more dignity and more grace than neil armstrong. he embodied all that is good and all that is great about america. >> more from memorial service for neil armstrong, thanks sitting day on c-span at 10:00 a.m. eastern. it just before 11:30, a behind- the-scenes look at life as a teenager in the white house
with this -- for this program. i ran into the following interesting thought. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that is enough to depress anybody. [laughter] name havewhat in god's we learned about our sacred craft of journalism? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> what are your predictions? [laughter] >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans are finally realize how bad things are, and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think there may be a resurgence of the kind you and i grew up with. >> it is a marvelous, optimistic thought. >> actually, no, it is a terrible thought because it suggests that the ship will almost have to sink before people jump into the lifeboats again. >> do you think that we can, truly, even define journalism? if somebody walks in the room and came from mars, and said what are these just talking about? if journalism, explain it to that guy. >> i guess the simplest way is to t
and get the job done. [inaudible question] >> politico, cbs and a number of other news organizations are reporting that bob dole of kansas has been hospitalized at walter reed outside of washington, according to senate majority leader harry reid. u.s. house will gavel back in in about 45 minutes at 6:30 eastern for a number of votes. they are back tomorrow, but no votes expected tomorrow. they had a little bit of housekeeping tomorrow, republicans take up committee assignments. on thursday, democrats will elect their leadership for the 113th congress and later this week, a bill dealing with making it easier for getting visas for foreign students earning degrees in the u.s. live house coverage when they come back here at 6:30 eastern. a discussion of u.s. energy efforts and the energy policy of the obama administration in the next four years. >> we want to welcome back to our table, president and c.e.o. of the american petroleum institute. let's go back to campaign 2012. the american petroleum institute spent about $868,000 on the 2012 campaign cycle. total contributions, $650,000. co
democrats will never give them. when the "new york times" or cbs reports that conversation or talk by lindsay graham, they said if he said i would be willing to raise taxes, the rest of the conversation disappears. so the challenge for cole -- obviously this was leaked, i don't think he intended to have a public conversation, but if you say things in front of 150 people -- >> he gave an interview. >> he meant to get it out that. then have a conversation about trying to raise taxes and we are sitting -- a handful of republicans -- as you say over 90% of the republicans kept the pledge. all this talk about someone might break the pledge. people having impure thoughts. >> impure thoughts? >> under certain circumstances >> what do you mean by impure thoughts? this is a family event. [laughter] >> maybe thinking about raising taxes. >> is that what republicans do? >> no. a few of them talk about it on tv. the good news is most of them don't. the handful in the last week said we might raise taxes under certain circumstances and i have chatted with a bunch of these guys and they are clear
a guarantee of entitlement reform, a series of things democrats will never give them. when the "new york times" or cbs reports that conversation or talk by lindsay graham, they said if he said i would be willing to raise taxes, the rest of the conversation disappears. so the challenge for cole -- obviously this was leaked, i don't think he intended to have a public conversation, but if you say things in front of 150 people -- >> he gave an interview. >> he meant to get it out that. then have a conversation about trying to raise taxes and we are sitting -- a handful of republicans -- as you say over 90% of the republicans kept the pledge. all this talk about someone might break the pledge. people having impure thoughts. >> impure thoughts? >> under certain circumstances -- >> what do you mean by impure thoughts? this is a family event. [laughter] >> maybe thinking about raising taxes. >> is that what republicans do? >> no. a few of them talk about it on tv. the good news is most of them don't. the handful in the last week said we might raise taxes under certain circumstances and i have chatted
on the fiscal of. but first, in news update. >> patrick donahoe in remarks earlier today on cbs this morning said the agency must be allowed to use prepayments on the retirement health-care fun and allow general mail delivery on saturday. he said he thinks most people do not realize that in his words, we are 100% self-sufficient. we pay our own way. but the postal agency is losing $16 billion this year. the epa is set -- is temporarily suspending bp from new contracts with the u.s. government. two weeks ago, bp agreed to plead guilty involving -- in its involvement in the death of a love and oil workers in the oil spill in the gulf in 2010. bp also agreed to lying to congress over how much oil was spilled. defense secretary leon panetta, along with the vice president's wife, dr. khiel biden, -- jill biden, held a dedication at the vietnam memorial here in washington. it is expanding the planned scope of the center to include more recent service members. they must still raise $38 million for construction. those are some of the headlines on c-span radio on 16 bases in the united states -- on
as ted koppel talks about the future of network news. he is interviewed by a former cbs reporter. the commuter caters takes a look at 30 years since the breakup of at&t. c-span 3 has a discussion on global pandemic prevention tonight at 8:00 eastern on the c-span networks. >> her how does one adequately express his feelings about a special friend? when that friend is also a world by con howe, a national hero of unimaginable proportions. and a legend whose name will live in history long after all here today will be forgotten. fate looked down when she chose meal to be the first to venture to another world. and have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our own. it could have been another. but it wasn't. and it wasn't for a reason. no one could have accepted the responsibility of his remarkable accomplishment with more dignity and a more grace than neil armstrong. he embodied all that is good and all that his gray about america. >> more for the memorial service of neil armstrong thanksgiving day at 10:00 a.m. eastern. the behind-the-scenes look at life as a teena
-span. re-airs begin at noon with meet the press, 1:00, abc's this week. fox news sunday. cnn state of the union at 3:00 and face the nation from cbs. listen to them all on c-span radio 91 fm. xm satellite channel 119. listen on your i-phone, blackberry or android. on c-span.org. truman had two big puzzles in his life. first was, this is a man that got in politics having failed in many businesses as a young man. and the only way to get in politics in missouri was to be part of a machine. there were two of them and he looked up with the pender gast machine arguably the most corrupt and often vicious machine. i said how did this happen? how could he work in this machine in local politics? that was the first thing i had to work out. the second of course is what we all know about and that is how did he come to use the atomic bomb? what was behind the decision? what's the story about the atomic bomb before he became president? and then when the decision was on his desk. it's still a controversial story and i wanted to know more about it. >> from his early life through his presidency. we
miller saying that he convened a briefing on the sandy response this morning. mark miller of cbs tweeted ."mments -- "let's get busy tweets for reporters covering the president. and again, he got an update on hurricane sandy. the turnout is heavy in new york and new jersey despite the storm on the follow-up to the storm. our c-span cameras on election day are covering the response in northern virginia. high school in mclean, virginia. a look at the line at the polling place in langley high school. a tweet -- "yeah, voting is a pain, but for a lot of people, standing in that line is a dream unfulfilled." >> the big things that people have been talking about in this election cycle, the influence of outside money on the race, and the three senate races where there's this huge influx of outside money, ohio, florida, and virginia, which are big battlegrounds. the democratic candidates who are getting the brunt of the outside spending are sort of expected to win in all of those races at this point. virginia is the closest, probably. ohio, some polls have showed closer, but the interesting thin
don't like that. >> we are not lying to you. all the networks, fox, cnn, abc, cbs have all declared the president has been reelected based on the electoral college vote. as the returns continue to come in, the president winning in new hampshire and the -- and iowa. there are pulls out west including california, washington state, and also winning in mexico. let's go to cleveland, ohio, democrats line. good evening. you are on the air. caller: my name is katila. >> if you could turn the volume down on your set, go ahead with your comments. caller: i was just calling to say, ok, i was just calling to say, wait to go, obama -- way to go, obama. >> independence seen -- independent scene. caller: i still have my hopes going. it seems it is a close campaign. it is possible for either party to win. my main issue on this is that it seems like people are concentrating way too much on the people's view on abortion and gay marriage than they're viewing the real ways they would, you know, run the country. >> ok. thanks for the call. we will continue to monitor obama headquarters in chicago and r
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)